Skip to content

Tag: eggs

Good Waffles

After a sweet request from my hard-working little boy for waffles for breakfast I relented knowing I’d have to make them from scratch. In the past I’ve always used Bisquick, or some other waffle mix–which I’m sorry to say has NO flavor. To me the batter tastes…well it doesn’t. At all. I wanted to find a good waffle mix.

Another confession–recipes calling for all-purpose flour intimidate me. The first recipe I found was from my all time favorite food-blogger Ree Drummond. I was not feeling all that culinary this morning, and the first step in her recipe was to sift. Sift. Really? At 8am with a house full of kids, I refuse to sift anything. My neighbors may have been able to hear me talk a little harshly to my friend  Ree (and by friend, I mean the woman whose blog I love to stalk, and who I secretly want to be when I grow up–and yes, I call her by her first name like we’re BFFs. Yeah, I may pretend to be Hyacinth, so what, we all have our little quirks.) Back to the story, me sitting at the table at my laptop with a puzzled somewhat aggravated facial expression… “I’m NOT sifting ANYTHING this morning REE!” I shouted while searching for a new recipe.

No, really guys, her recipes are THE best, and I know if I had been in the mood to sift those would have been the best rootin’ tootin’ waffles I ever did taste. If you’re feeling like sifting give her recipe a try here. I highly recommend anything she makes! I ain’t mad at ya’ Ree, I got nothin’ but love for ya’.

My handy dandy Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook–you know the red and white checkered one that all southern ladies are required to own to begin ‘keepin’ house’ with–well I have to tell you, it let me down in the past when it came to waffles as well. No flavor.

“Perhaps you’re expecting too much from your waffle batter Cornbread Mama”, you might say. No, no, I don’t think I am. I’m not asking for pumpkin spice waffles, although Pinterest is FULL of those recipes right now. One called for almond meal–um–which I don’t have and can’t afford. I also found a recipe for cornbread waffles and pulled pork, my feelings on which are yet to be decided. Right now I’m leaning toward yummy-let’s-try-that-one-night-for-supper. As for now, I just wanted plain ole’ good tasting waffles. I mean if the cook at Waffle House can do it, surely I can.

Finally I found this recipe. I followed it almost exactly, AP flour and all. I don’t think I ever follow a recipe precisely. It has to be a major character flaw. I used my stand mixer to beat the eggs, with the whisk-y attachment (I have to tell you I’ve never used that attachment before, but it was awesome!). I continued to make the whole recipe with the mixer and the whisk attachment, being careful not to over-beat it. These waffles turned out very, very nice. While they don’t have tons of flavor, they have just enough. That’s really all I wanted. Everyone was happy.

Good Waffles

2 eggs

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 3/4 cup milk

1/2 cup veg oil

1 tbs white sugar

4 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat waffle iron. Whisk eggs until fluffy using a stand mixer. Mix in flour, milk, oil, sugar, baking powder, salt, and vanilla just until smooth. Spray waffle iron with cooking spray (or if you’re out like I am brush on olive oil lightly). Pour mix onto hot waffle iron and cook until golden brown. For my waffle iron I found that 10 minutes turned out a perfect waffle.

Good Waffles

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup veg oil
  • 1 tbs white sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Preheat waffle iron.
  2. Whisk eggs until fluffy using a stand mixer.
  3. Mix in flour, milk, oil, sugar, baking powder, salt, and vanilla just until smooth.
  4. Spray waffle iron with cooking spray (or if you're out like I am brush on olive oil lightly).
  5. Pour mix onto hot waffle iron and cook until golden brown.
  6. For my waffle iron I found that 10 minutes turned out a perfect waffle.
Recipe Management Powered by Zip Recipes Plugin
http://cornbreadmama.com/waffles/

Comments closed

Baked Ham, Egg, & Cheese Cups

BREAKFAST … DAH-DAH-DAAAAAAAHHHH!

The word that strikes fear into Mom-hearts everywhere. What to make, when to make it, and how to get the kids to eat before time to rush out the door? That truly is the question.

It’s also hard to find low carb & easy things (that I like, because I’m picky). Most of my favorite breakfast foods are full of starchy-carby-goodness, something I’ve been avoiding for the past 8-plus months. The obvious answer to that – EGGS! Sadly, I’ve never been a huge fan of eggs (unless they are in cheesecake, wink-wink). Scrambled eggs, fried eggs, boiled eggs, they’re all just sort of MEH to me.

As a child my mother once made me eat scrambled eggs with cheese … I’ll save you the play-by-play … suffice to say, I don’t like cheese eggs. She never asked me to eat them again. Sorry Mom.

However, my pal Diana recently changed my mind with these hand-held, on-the-go, low-carb, & easy baked egg breakfast cups. Another plus – you can freeze them once cooked and reheat for those crazy mornings when you’re rushing to get out of the door. Just wrap each baked cup in freezer paper and place in a plastic freezer bag to freeze. Either thaw overnight for morning and reheat or try it directly from the freezer. You may need to play with thawing/heating times to get it just right.

While you can add any “fixin’s” you’d like, it would be hard to top Diana’s combination of egg, cheese, ham, onion, bell pepper, and mushroom.

Baked Ham, Egg, & Cheese Cups

Ingredients for a 12-cup muffin tin

1 dozen eggs

12 slices of ham (Land-o-Frost is our favorite brand)

Shredded cheddar cheese (I use mild)

Chopped onion, bell pepper, and mushroom (as much or little as you’d like)

Directions

Spray the muffin tin well with cooking spray. Line each muffin cup with a slice of ham. Sprinkle cheese in each cup. Add your other ingredients, like onion, bell pepper, and mushroom to the cups.

cornbread_mama_egg_cups_2With a whisk or fork beat 12 eggs with a little milk, salt, & pepper. Pour egg mixture into each cup.

cornbread_mama_egg_cups_3
I forgot to add the salt & pepper to my eggs while beating, it also works to sprinkle atop the cups before baking.

Bake at 350 degrees until done (about 20-25 minutes). Remove with a fork and you have a hand-held easy-peasy low-carb breakfast.

Baked Ham, Egg, & Cheese Cups (12 cups)

Baked Ham, Egg, & Cheese Cups (12 cups)

Ingredients

  • 1 dozen eggs
  • 12 slices of ham (Land-o-Frost is our favorite brand)
  • Shredded cheddar cheese (I use mild)
  • Chopped onion, bell pepper, and mushroom (as much or little as you’d like)

Instructions

  1. Spray the muffin tin well with cooking spray.
  2. Line each muffin cup with a slice of ham.
  3. Sprinkle cheese in each cup.
  4. Add your other ingredients, like onion, bell pepper, and mushroom to the cups.
  5. With a whisk or fork beat 12 eggs with a little milk, salt, & pepper.
  6. Pour egg mixture into each cup.
  7. Bake at 350 degrees until done (about 20-25 minutes).
  8. Remove with a fork and you have a hand-held easy-peasy low-carb breakfast.
Recipe Management Powered by Zip Recipes Plugin
http://cornbreadmama.com/bakedeggcups/

Comments closed

Mr. Fancy Pants & His Ladies

Look at our pretty chickens and our rooster, I know I don’t share their pictures nearly as much as our beloved cows, so here ‘ya go. I figured I should go ahead and share because we are getting closer to calving season and they will really get no attention once the babies get here.

Chickens in the mail
Chickens in the mail 2013

We have 8 Australorp chickens (good egg layers – supposedly – however we’re only getting maybe 4 eggs a day right now) and 1 rooster named Mr. Fancy Pants; he’s an Ameraucana, we think. He has a tiny head and a long neck. I think he’s awfully strange looking, especially when he gets to crowing and the feathers on his neck stick out. It’s quite comical. Thankfully he is much nicer than the previous rooster who kept spurring Cornbread Boy until one day he had enough.

That day he called Cornbread Daddy and said he’d turned him out and we never saw that rooster again. Guess he wasn’t so tough when he wasn’t attacking a 9 year old boy.

Overall our experience with chickens has been a good one. Fresh eggs every morning and fun to watch as well. We’ve had them for right at 2 years now. I highly recommend chickens to anyone wanting to get into farming.

 

ABOUT CORNBREAD MAMA

Living on a small family farm in the Southeast Cornbread Mama enjoys sharing about her life. Between being the wife of a cowboy, homeschooling mom to boy/girl twins, artist, and Christ-follower praying for a simple life in this crazy world Cornbread Mama finds comfort in writing about her family adventures here on the farm surrounded by 18 cows and calves, 2 donkeys, 3 dogs, and 9 chickens. So pull up a rocker and sit a spell.

Comments closed

Questionable Egg? No More With This Handy Info-Graphic

I have a nice info-graphic for you today. If you are the curious sort, an info-graphic is a visual image such as a chart or diagram used to represent information or data.

A little info about us here on the farm that you may not have known 1.) we live on a farm, and 2.) we have laying chickens – actually we have chickens and cows and donkeys.

Our children have many responsibilities around here. Each day it’s their job to feed/water if necessary, and collect any eggs.

And if you have children, know that even farm children have tendencies much like your own. It takes a while for them to learn responsibility. Some longer than others. Like regular kids, if you do not stand over them and issue their orders every minute things may not be done exactly as you would like. This is normal and part of the learning process.

At least that’s what I’m telling myself.

On to the info-graphic. Our dear daughter, 10 years old, twin to our dear son, collects the eggs daily. Or so she should. Sometimes it’s been a day or two or four before she brings in the eggs. Right now our chickens are being lazy and only producing 1 egg a day. Which may lead to another post in which I explain how to pluck a chicken before cooking it. I’m joking. Sort of.

My point is this, she brings in the eggs, puts them in a basket on the counter to be washed. Now this is something you probably don’t know either, chicken eggs have a natural barrier before washing that prevents bacteria and other nasties from soaking into the eggs. It’s called the bloom. Once you wash them they are only good for a couple of weeks. Before they’re washed they can last up to 5 weeks! Or so I’ve heard. I’ve never pushed it that long. Well I found this info and had to share. It’s such a good and simple way to make sure your eggs are fresh.

If you buy store bought eggs give it a try and see what happens.

How to know your eggs are fresh
How to know your eggs are fresh

Egg Test:

Fill a bowl with cold water. Place your eggs in the bowl. If the egg sinks to the bottom on it’s side it’s a very fresh egg. If it begins to float a little it’s a little older but still good. If it floats at the top of the bowl, chunk it. No good.

So there you go, happy Egging.

Thanks for reading y’all! – Cornbread Mama

Originally published in the Leaf January 2015 SkepticKelli article. 

About Cornbread Mama (Kelli)

A homeschooling, graphic designing, farm living, Christ following, food loving artistic mom of twins. She’s wife to a hard-working cowboy, in search of a simple life in this frantic busy world.  

Comments closed
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
%d bloggers like this: